Rules of Auto Racing – Use the Whole Track, Don’t Run Out of Gas, and Don’t Crash on the Last Lap

Checkered FlagOkay so, I’ve done little better racing myself, most of it legal on the track, and the first thing they teach you in racing school is to use all the track, and not to be afraid to do whatever it takes, and go anywhere on that track to help you take the advantage, pass another car, or get out of the way when needed. There are of course other basics in racing such as; have the best pit crew, drive the best equipment, run the best tires, and have the best sponsors with the best money backing you.

Memorial Day weekend in 2011 turned out to be a very interesting day in racing history, and it appeared that more lessons were learned, and races won due to prudent decision-making and working with the fundamentals. In the Indianapolis 500 on the very last turn the leader lost control of his formula 1 car while passing and lapping a slower car, he hit the wall, and slid towards the finish line. However, he was passed by the second-place car who won the race.

There was an interesting article recently on May 30, 2011 about “The 95-TH Running of the Indianapolis 500: As The Leader Turns” which ran prior on the weekend titled “Wheldon’s Wall Win – Last Turn Crash by Rookie Let’s Veteran Win Indianapolis 500″ by Paul Newberry of the Associated Press, and I read my copy of this article in The Desert Sun Online Version MyDesert [dot] com.

Of course not to be outdone, NASCAR also had a big race, but how could they top that? Well, the leader ran out of gas, coming into the last turn, and without any throttle coasted to the finish line, but he was also passed by the second-place racer. Yes, this was the next day.

Indeed, NASCAR had a last minute turn of events also, the leader of the race ran his car out of gas, can you believe it? There was a great article in the USA Today titled; “Hey, Conspiracy Theorists, NASCAR Ran a Good Show” by Jenna Fryer (AP Auto Racing Writer and a good one at that I might add). This article also published on May 30, 2011. The article stated;

“The longest race of the season seemed destined to be a snoozer. Instead, the suspense started early and carried all the way to the checkered flag, which went to Kevin Harvick when Dale Earnhardt Jr. ran out of gas on the last lap. The only way it could have gone better for NASCAR would have been if Earnhardt actually won and snapped his 105-race losing streak.”

Money saving strategies

Change your attitude to your mortgage

Unless you make the mistake of buying a train ticket in Britain on the day of travel, the most expensive item you are ever likely to buy is your home. If you’re not in the privileged position to pay cash, make sure the loan you use to finance it is the best available. For example, if you are paying your lender’s full standard variable rate (SVR) you are probably paying hundreds of pounds a year more than you need to. There are thousands of deals to choose from and while it is vital to check the small print for hidden catches, this is a relatively easy way to save a lot of money. Remember: loyalty to your bank benefits your bank, not you.

Even better, if you can afford to make overpayments on your mortgage, you’ll clear your debt several years early and make massive savings. For example, if you borrow £100,000 at 6% over 25 years, you’ll pay it back at £643 a month. The total charge for credit will be £93,000. But if you can overpay by £100 a month you’ll clear the loan in less than 19 years, logbook loans 247 giving you 6 years of mortgage-free living and saving a staggering £25,000 in interest.

Clear your credit card debt

One of the golden rules of financial planning is to clear your most expensive debts first, in other words your credit cards. OK, credit cards offer a convenient way to pay for goods and services but if you can’t clear the balance every month, consider a low-cost loan as an alternative. Do the sums: a credit card debt (APR 16.8%) of £2,500 over five years will cost £1,212 in interest. A loan at 7.8% will cost £527. A saving of £685.

Cut the cost of your fuel bills

Because official inflation calculations don’t include the price of things that go up, energy companies are allowed to increase bills by 10.4% whenever they feel like it. They try to do it every time you blink. Average gas and http://www.logbookloans247.co.uk/ electricity bills now stand at around £1,500 a year. In exchange for one fifth of a state pension, you get completely incomprehensible bills and guff from the chief executive about how everyone else is to blame. But that doesn’t mean you need to be ripped off. If you’ve never dumped your original supplier you can still save more than £300 a year. If you have switched before, you can, as a result of this flawed privatisation, switch again to any number of companies that will charge you about the same. If you believe that gas and electricity prices won’t fall in the near future, you can fix your bills for up to four years. It is very easy to switch. You can do so with a few clicks of the mouse. Your new supplier will take care of the formalities.